Articles

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To ensure its continued ability to provide research and education efforts for the state’s grape and wine industries, the University of Kentucky plans to sell some of the wine it produces through that research.

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Adults with physical and intellectual disabilities in Henderson are learning how to become more independent through a gardening program offered by the Hugh Edward Sandefur Training Center and the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

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TreeSnap, new phone app developed by the University of Kentucky Forest Health Research Center and the University of Tennessee Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology for Android and iOS cell phones is designed to connect scientists with foresters, landowners and interested citizens in an effort to protect and restore the nation’s trees.

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The University of Kentucky’s Seth DeBolt is a man of many interests and passions, most especially finding the answers to basic research questions which hold the key to opening up a world of potential applications that can improve our everyday lives.

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The Bluegrass State is often recognized for the beauty of the Appalachian Mountains, its vast cave system and its magnificent forest, together boasting a biodiversity to rival any state in the nation. But none of these ecological wonders would be possible without the waters that course throughout the state. Lakes, springs and rivers have fostered growth in the Commonwealth for millennia, and water has shaped Kentucky from its initial settlements to its contemporary livelihood.

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Most beef cattle-producing states have been able to escape drought conditions so far this year and Kentucky producers enjoyed significant rainfall in early July that put them in a good position this summer. Still, weather aside, Cattle prices have improved from recent declines but remain lower than this time last year.

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A recent partnership between the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s School of Human Environmental Sciences and the Kentucky Extension Homemakers Association (KEHA) is benefiting two villages in Ghana by fulfilling their wish for new sewing machines.

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Most people who run a store or help manage a hotel will tell you it’s next to impossible to pursue a graduate degree in their field simply because they would have to quit their current job in order to return to college. A new program from University of Kentucky’s School of Human Environmental Sciences within the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment just may eliminate that roadblock.

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Gardens have long been associated with physical health benefits, and their benefits to emotional and mental health are becoming more well known. Nowhere is this truer than at the garden at the YMCA Safe Place in Louisville.

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University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards has announced that four UK graduates have been offered Fulbright U.S. Student Program scholarships and three have accepted the award. The UK recipients are among approximately 1,700 U.S. citizens who will travel abroad for the 2017-18 academic year through the prestigious program. In addition, two other UK students were selected as alternates for the program.

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University of Kentucky’s Corn, Soybean and Tobacco Field Day is quickly approaching. The field day, hosted by the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is July 27 at the UK Research and Education Center Farm in Princeton. It will occur rain or shine.

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Kentucky forests are becoming fragmented, and landowners’ objectives are changing. Woodland owners who are wondering how to get the most from their property can benefit from attending one of three short courses being offered around the state this summer by the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

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The West Kentucky 4-H Camp in Dawson Springs is in the direct path of a total solar eclipse that will occur Aug. 21. Kentucky 4-H is taking this rare opportunity to host a Solar Eclipse Camp there so young people cannot only view the historical event but learn the science behind it.

The last time a total solar eclipse was viewable from the contiguous United States was in 1979, when it passed through the Northwest.

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A University of Kentucky plant pathologist is part of an international team of researchers who have uncovered an important link to a disease which left unchecked could prove devastating to wheat.

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Lee County residents are learning low-cost methods they can use to improve their health through gardening. Ted Johnson, a University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service agent in the county, installed several raised bed gardens at the extension office. He offers classes to residents throughout the growing season to show them how raised bed gardening is easy, economical and healthy.

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A longtime University of Kentucky educator, researcher and farmer is the new chair of the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

Michael Montross assumed his new role July 1.

Montross has been a member of the department since 1999, after he graduated with a doctorate from Purdue University. He also holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Michigan State University.

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One of the burgeoning fields of the 21st century is biotechnology, which draws from many scientific disciplines to study living organisms. The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is hosting UK Ag Biotech Day, a free event for high school students to introduce them to the vast array of career opportunities in agriculture the field offers.

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In Johnson County, Brenda Cockerham has worked for the past 20 years with local artisans, farmers, community leaders and residents to build the county’s capacity for tourism for the past 20 years. With the county’s first comprehensive tourism packages about to launch, Cockerham turned to a University of Kentucky student for marketing assistance.

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University of Kentucky researchers are looking for Lexingtonians interested in improving their health while gaining a greater awareness of their natural environment for a six-week research pilot project.

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For 59 years, Farm-City Field Day has brought city and country folk together on a Franklin County farm for a morning filled with educational tours, exhibits and a tasty picnic lunch. This year, the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service event will take place July 6 at the Steve Thornton family farm, 5932 Mt. Zion Road on the west side of the county.

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A study by the University of Kentucky’s Community and Economic Development Initiative of Kentucky shows that agriculture is a valuable asset to Fayette County’s economy. Agriculture and the businesses that support it are responsible for one out of 12 jobs and for $2.3 billion in annual output.

The CEDIK study was unveiled at a recent Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government council work session.

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Kentucky has a reputation for producing quality forages to feed its well-known livestock and equine industries, but Lexington’s skyline can keep many residents from seeing the grasses that blanket the area’s iconic rolling landscape. A field trip to the University of Kentucky’s Spindletop and Maine Chance research farms gave Millcreek Elementary School students the opportunity to get out of the city and learn about the pastures for which Kentucky is so famous.

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University of Kentucky family sciences doctoral student Albert Ksinan, from the Czech Republic, received an invitation to attend the European Association for Developmental Psychology (EADP)-European Society for Research on Adolescence (EARA)-Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA) Summer School program in Utrecht, the Netherlands.

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A group of University of Kentucky scientists have discovered a more efficient way for legumes to fix nitrogen.

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