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A panel of community advocates will come together for the second P.R.E.P Talk at 6 p.m. Feb. 25 in the University of Kentucky’s Seay Auditorium. P.R.E.P. stands for Prevent, Reduce and Eliminate Poverty.

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A University of Kentucky entomologist is  leading an international effort to find long-term, sustainable control options to effectively manage a mosquito known to transport several potential deadly viruses, including the Zika virus.

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Misdee Wrigley Miller, winner of two American Saddlebred world horse championship titles and the first rider to win the three-gaited “grand slam,” as well as a Team USA member at the 2014 World Equestrian Games in combined driving, will speak at the University of Kentucky Ag Equine Programs’ next Distinguished Industry Lecture Series at 6 p.m. EST Feb. 9 in the Gluck Equine Research Center’s auditorium on the UK campus.

Sponsored by Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, the event is free and open to the public.

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More than 100,000 cattle move through the Bluegrass Stockyards each year. The facility has been a mainstay in Central Kentucky since the mid-1930s. Recently a massive fire completely destroyed the location near downtown Lexington, and local producers will feel its absence.

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Relationships need the proper attention and care to function properly just like many other things in our lives. Visiting a doctor regularly is necessary to maintain a healthy body, just as routine maintenance is key to keep a car running.

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Nobody likes to think of getting a bed bug bite, but those bites have become all too common in recent years. Now a group of international researchers has taken a significant step forward in understanding how to control these pesky insects.

The group called the Bed Bug Genome Consortium recently sequenced the genome of this insect. Their findings, which included more than 14,000 protein-coding genes, were recently published in a journal article in Nature Communications.

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University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service agents and UK Ag Equine Programs will host Pastures Please!! 6 p.m. Feb. 11 at the Kentucky Community and Technical College System office, 300 North Main St, in Versailles. The public is invited to the free annual event, particularly horse owners and farm managers interested in the latest information about horse pasture management.

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The first research crowdfunding project launched at the University of Kentucky helped secure an approximate $2.1 million, five-year, multiple species grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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As a third-grader, Ellis Shelley was not a typical child. A self-described science nerd, he often would rush home from school and into the barn to check on chicken eggs in the incubator. The Albany, Kentucky, native could explain exactly what was happening in each phase of the 21-day incubation cycle.

“When I took reproductive physiology during my undergraduate studies, I recalled that experience and realized science was always where I was destined to be,” he said.

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Soil scientists in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment are getting promising results from several treatments that appear to be breaking down the fragipan, a cement-like layer common in many soils in Western and Central Kentucky.

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The beef industry is always changing, sometimes very rapidly with regard to weather, market prices, fuel and other input costs. Add external forces such as national and world politics, economics, animal rights and consumer perceptions, and beef producers have many situations to manage and overcome to turn a profit.

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Soil microbes transform nutrients in the soil into a usable form for plants. A University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment researcher studied the effects climate change could have on these essential organisms.

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 Most of us view a trip to the grocery store as a chore, but for one University of Kentucky professor, it’s all in a day’s work.

Alison Gustafson, an assistant professor in UK’s Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, has always been interested in people, what they eat and why they make the choices they make when it comes to food. 

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As they tumble down the length of the Rupp Arena court or the end zone of Commonwealth Stadium, UK cheerleaders John and Josh Marsh garner their fair share of attention.

If you are a UK Basketball or Football fan, you’ve surely seen them defy gravity as they tumble in tandem. But there’s a special reason why they are so in sync with each other. They are actually brothers who spent much of their childhood outside of Atlanta training at their mother’s gym.

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It’s a goal of most scientists to have their research published in a peer-reviewed academic journal, but critics of peer review have argued that a person’s gender can impact how their papers are reviewed and, thus, their ability to be published. As editor of the journal Functional Ecology, University of Kentucky entomologist Charles Fox recently conducted two studies looking for any potential gender biases in the journal’s peer review and editorial selection processes.

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Six University of Kentucky educators were recently named recipients of the UK Alumni Association 2016 Great Teacher Award.

The recipients are:

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Leptospirosis is a costly disease for livestock and pet owners. Causing problems like abortion, premature birth, blindness and more, the disease spreads easily through nose, mouth and eye contact. A vaccine has been available for several years for cattle, swine, sheep and dogs, but until recently, horses were left unprotected.

Researchers at the University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Lab in Lexington recently celebrated the culmination of many years of work with the release of a vaccine for equine leptospirosis.

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Kentucky’s quality forage base affords many opportunities for goat and sheep producers when it comes to grazing pastures. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture reported that goat numbers continue to rise in the state and while sheep numbers have decreased, they are still 50 percent higher than in 2008. New and established producers can benefit from educational opportunities at the upcoming annual Kentucky Small Ruminant Grazing Conference.

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 Midwestern forage and livestock producers can get the latest research-based information at the Heart of America Grazing Conference. Hosted by the Kentucky Forage and Grassland Council and the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, the conference begins the afternoon of Jan. 25 and goes through the afternoon of Jan. 26 at the Hilton Hotel in downtown Lexington. One- and two-day registrations are available.

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Kentucky wheat growers looking for ways to maximize their profitability should mark their calendars for the 2016 University of Kentucky Winter Wheat Meeting. The annual meeting, hosted by the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. CST Jan. 5 at the James E. Bruce Convention Center in Hopkinsville.

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The Bluegrass Small Business Development Center will host a 10-week program offering instruction to women and minority business owners who wish to compete in the construction industry. Registration is open until Dec. 24, and classes will begin on Jan. 12.

The Minority and Women Training Program began in 2001 as a way to increase construction opportunities for women and minority business owners and has graduated more than 100 entrepreneurs statewide.

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Two University of Kentucky seniors have been awarded Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships to study abroad this spring.

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Three members of the University of Kentucky School of Human Environmental Sciences recently were named recipients of the school’s Patricia Brantley Todd Awards of Excellence.

The biannual awards recognize individuals within the school, which is part of the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. They are named for Todd, a school alumna and wife of former UK president Lee T. Todd, Jr. The Todds fund the $1,000 awards.

The 2015 recipients are:

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People involved in a wide variety of food venues in Lexington are enthusiastic about the increasing demand for local food, a University of Kentucky study found. Researchers behind the Fayette County Local Food Demand Assessment estimate that Lexington businesses in 2014 spent approximately $14 million on Kentucky food products—money that went directly to farmers—with growth likely to continue to $20 million to $24 million in sales by 2020.

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