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The University of Kentucky Ag Equine Programs will host its ninth annual UK Equine Career and Opportunity Fair from 4:30 to 7 p.m. EST March 7 at Spindletop Hall in Lexington.

The free event provides college students with the chance to meet prospective equine industry employers and to learn about potential volunteer, internship and part-time and full-time employment opportunities. In addition to booths from area equine businesses, attendees can participate in sessions led by industry professionals, who will offer tips and one-on-one career advice.

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It is likely eastern tent caterpillars will begin to hatch soon, according to Lee Townsend, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment extension entomologist.

“Eastern tent caterpillars are among the first insects to appear in the spring. Consequently, they can cope with the erratic temperature swings that are common in Kentucky. This year’s unseasonable warmth points to abnormally early activity,” Townsend said.

Eggs from a mass Townsend collected on Feb. 17 hatched after a weekend indoors.

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A new University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment program focused on helping livestock and forage managers more efficiently produce and use stored forages will begin next month in Adair County.

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Another round of the University of Kentucky’s Master Cattleman program will begin soon. More than 4,000 beef producers have already participated in the comprehensive program and put the management strategies they learned into practice in their operations.

The Master Cattleman program consists of 10 sessions that include management, marketing, nutrition, reproduction, health, genetics, forages, facilities, environment and end product.

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The College of Agriculture, Food and Environment will host a talk with Professor Mark Courtney, of the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago (UC), about his research findings over the past 20 years on the transition to adulthood for foster youth in state care in the U.S. The free public lecture will be held 2-2:50 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22, in room 200, of the Funkhouser Building. 

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When Anderson County livestock producer Mike Wilson bought a 60-acre hayfield in Franklin County, he knew he had a lot of work in front of him.

The previous owners had let people cut hay for nearly 30 years without putting any nutrients back into the ground, which meant the existing grass stand was a mixture of Kentucky 31 tall fescue and weeds.

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The ever-changing beef industry ebbs and flows with the weather, market prices, fuel and other input costs. With the added influence of external forces such as national and world politics, economics, animal rights and consumer perceptions, beef producers have much to manage and overcome to turn a profit.

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The Kentucky Small Business Development Center is seeking nominations for the 2017 Pacesetter Awards. The recognition program was created to honor high performing, second-stage businesses that are changing Kentucky’s economic landscape. The deadline to submit nominations is March 15.

KSBDC encourages small businesses that meet the following minimum qualifications to apply:

·       Privately held

·       In business for three or more years

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The Ohio River Valley Woodlands and Wildlife Workshop returns to Kentucky on March 25.

This year’s workshop, an event covering Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio, will be held in the Boone County Cooperative Extension Enrichment Center in Burlington. Forestry experts will provide an array of forestry- and wildlife-related educational sessions to help woodland owners get the most from their properties.

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James Votruba, Northern Kentucky University’s president emeritus, will visit the University of Kentucky campus Feb. 20-23 as this year’s W. Norris Duvall Leader in Residence.

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A little known University of Kentucky costume collection will make its big screen debut when a documentary on Lexington’s most famous madam premieres at the Kentucky Theatre Feb. 16.

The documentary, “Brezing and the Gilded Age of the Bluegrass,” will feature garments from UK’s Betty D. Eastin Historic Costume Collection and an interview with Kim Spillman, who manages the collection and is an associate professor in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

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Mild weather this winter is likely the cause of higher than average concentrations of a toxic substance in tall fescue called ergovaline that has been observed in Fayette and Bourbon pastures in Central Kentucky, according to University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment experts,. Tall fescue toxicosis in broodmares, which is caused by ingesting ergovaline, is rare in the early months of the year due to typically cold winter temperatures.

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Registration is open for the 2017 season of the University of Kentucky’s Community Supported Agriculture Project. All UK faculty, staff and students are eligible to enroll in the program, which provides a weekly share of fresh vegetables from May through October from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-certified organic unit of the Horticulture Research Farm in Lexington.

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Stuart Brown, a veterinarian and partner at Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, was named chair of the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Research Foundation’s board of directors at its January meeting. Michael Banahan, director of farm operations for Godolphin LLC (USA), was named vice chair.

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Jimmy Henning will step down as associate dean for extension and director of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service on Feb. 15 to return to the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s faculty as an extension forage specialist. Henning has led the extension service since 2007.

“I have wanted to return to the field for some time,” Henning said. “With the renewed emphasis on forage programs as part of the Grain and Forage Center of Excellence and the continued need for the same in Eastern Kentucky, the timing just seems right.”

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The University of Kentucky Wheat Science Group recently honored Kentucky producer Don Halcomb with its first Service Award.

The group created the award to recognize individuals for their partnerships with and contributions to wheat research in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

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The University of Kentucky Wheat Science Group will offer a series of hands-on trainings during this growing season as an in-depth educational opportunity for experienced wheat producers, crop advisers and farm managers.

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Fourteen University of Kentucky undergraduate students -- one sophomore, two juniors and 11 seniors -- were recently awarded with Oswald Research and Creativity Program awards by the Office of Undergraduate Research.  

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Love ‘em or hate ‘em, people are fascinated by snakes. The University of Kentucky’s updated snake ID website has enough information to satisfy just about any question a person could have concerning the slitherer cutting across their patio or field.

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The kissing bug may sound like a virus that plagues the protagonist of a romantic comedy, but in fact, these insects are real, and one species does occur in Kentucky. These blood-feeding insects have received a lot of media attention due to the potential health effects of their bites in the southwestern United States. University of Kentucky extension entomologist Lee Townsend recently discussed what Kentuckians need to know about the insect.

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In the first row, a young boy sat, round brown eyes glued to the presenter who paced a few feet in front of him. His gaze never wavered. The message he was listening to seemed to be sinking in.

That’s what Steven Hollen was aiming for. Hollen, a storyteller with a musical, rolling accent that reflects the Eastern Kentucky hills in which he grew up, recently reached out to the seventh and eighth graders in Elliott County Middle School with one very important message: everyone in that room mattered.

“I am somebody,” the students repeated after him.

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As part of faculty development efforts, the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (KCPE) has planned a series of workshops to address the personal, interpersonal and organizational issues faced by early career underrepresented faculty of color. Kentucky colleges and universities were asked to nominate faculty members for the Academic Leadership Development Institute.

Several faculty members at the University of Kentucky were nominated. Ultimately, three were chosen to participate in the program.

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 Eight 4-Hers recently got to be a part of history on horseback. A few weeks ago, Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell invited the Boone County 4-H Elite Equestrian Drill Team to participate in President Donald Trump’s inauguration parade. Horses have always played a role in the parade since Thomas Jefferson’s second term in 1805.

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It has been more than two decades since the last comprehensive study of conditions and compliance with state shelter laws in Kentucky’s county animal shelters. Researchers at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s Department of Veterinary Science recently took on the challenge and also used it as an opportunity to partner with a new Tennessee veterinary school.

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