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The University of Kentucky is teaming up with the University of Minnesota to offer the 2017 Conference on Precision Dairy Farming in Lexington.

The conference is May 30 through June 1 at UK’s Coldstream Dairy Farm and the Hyatt Regency in downtown Lexington.

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Slowly and methodically, farmers cut into a wheat plant under the guidance of University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment specialists. To the farmers, this exercise to reveal tillers still inside the stem was more than a scientific procedure. It gave them tools to help them assess potential freeze damage to their crop and make a decision on what to do next.

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University of Kentucky 1982 alumnus Dwayne Buckles was “stalled” in his career with a company “that really didn't fit the culture and interest I was looking for,” he said.

Buckles credits Job Club with helping him jump to that next stage in his career. Job Club is a collaborative effort between the UK Alumni Association Career Services, UK Human Resources Staff Career Development and the Fayette County Cooperative Extension, created to help those unemployed and under-employed with their job searches.

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Keiko Tanaka, professor in the Department of Community and Leadership Development in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, will be one of five panelists in "Immigration and Higher Education: Faculty Migration Stories at UK," noon to 1 p.m. March 22 in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library

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Aquaculture producers or those interested in learning how to produce a variety of fish as well as freshwater shrimp are invited to a Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service outdoor aquaculture program at the Kentucky State University Aquaculture Research Center in Frankfort on Saturday, April 22.  

Kentucky State University researchers and extension specialists for aquaculture as well as an aquaculture specialist from the Kentucky Department of Agriculture are the featured speakers. The free, daylong event begins at 9 a.m. EDT.

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The Kentucky 4-H Foundation recently named Melissa Miller as executive director and Benjamin Carr as director of advancement.

Miller is responsible for the oversight and management of the foundation, and Carr is the organization’s chief fundraising officer.

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In past years, the University of Kentucky’s popular lawn mower clinic has filled up fast. This year, the group from the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is adding a second clinic to handle demand. Students in the UK Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering will host clinics March 23-26 and March 30-April 2 to sharpen mower blades and their skills.

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Recent freezing temperatures may have caused damage to Kentucky’s wheat crop. The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment will host an emergency wheat freeze damage training to help producers assess potential damage and help them make appropriate management decisions.

The training begins with registration at 8 a.m. CDT Tuesday, March 21 at the University of Kentucky Research and Education Center near Princeton. The program starts at 8:30 a.m.

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Food waste and food insecurity are challenges in Kentucky and throughout the United States. A research project conducted by a University of Kentucky undergraduate student shows that a student-led UK program is succeeding in efforts to reduce the rate of both.

Kendra Oo, a UK senior from Myanmar, studied the effectiveness of the summer gleaning program of the Campus Kitchen at the University of Kentucky, a program in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. It is part of the national Campus Kitchens Project.

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Though starting a business has changed dramatically over the last 36 years, the Kentucky Small Business Development Center network has been there throughout. To celebrate the positive effect KSBDC’s consultants have across the state each year, the network of 12 offices will take part in the inaugural SBDC Day on March 22.

SBDC Day is a national movement created by America’s Small Business Development Center to help share the small-business success stories and the impact SBDCs have fostered in communities across the country.

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It may feel urban or suburban to many, but the plants, animals and fungi found in cities and towns make up a unique ecosystem. Research shows urban forests benefit built-up areas not only environmentally, but also socially and economically. As in all forests, herbaceous plants and trees are vital to a functional urban forest, and this will be the focus of two public seminars hosted by the University of Kentucky Urban Forest Initiative.

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Kentucky has enjoyed a mild winter which has resulted in many trees, plants and crops beginning to sprout and bloom before their usual times. The forecast for the next several days is not good news for those early bloomers.

Meteorologists for the University of Kentucky Agricultural Weather Center are predicting low temps to reach into the 20s for at least five days in the upcoming week.

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The safety net for soybean revenue insurance provides more protection as compared to 2016, and that’s good news for producers who are still weighing their options ahead of the March 15 deadline, according to Todd Davis, agricultural economist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

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Two years ago, the worst outbreak of bird flu to hit the United States wiped out more than 48 million birds. But it also taught poultry producers how to fight back against future outbreaks.

Recently H7, highly pathogenic strain of avian influenza, or HPAI, appeared on a large poultry farm in Tennessee by way of migratory ducks and geese. Currently no birds in Kentucky are infected, however University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment specialists are urging all poultry producers to take precautions and to stay aware.

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For a landscape tree, there’s nothing like a good pruning. Removing dead wood or undesirable growth or trimming to control the size are all important steps to maintaining a healthy tree in the home landscape. Pruning, however, is more than a matter of lopping off branches. There’s a method to the science, a method University of Kentucky senior arborist Stacy Borden will teach in a free workshop, Tree Pruning 101, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. March 11.

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Carleigh Fedorka, the winner of the University of Kentucky Graduate School’s Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition last November, is representing her university in the Southern Council of Graduate Schools Regional Competition held in Annapolis, Maryland, this weekend.

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After a long, cold winter, sheep are usually ready to shed their wooly coats. But this year, they may be even more ready, with the mild temperatures Kentucky has experienced. Learning to sheer sheep is essential for a producer to have a quality flock. To that end, the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is hosting a shearing school for beginners and experienced shearers March 21-22 at the C. Oran Little Research Center in Versailles.

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Quentin Tyler, assistant dean and director of diversity for the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment recently was accepted for the 2016-2018 Food Systems Leadership Institute, an executive leadership development program for academia, industry and government.

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For those interested in learning more about indoor marine shrimp and tilapia production and aquaponics, the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service will host an aquaculture program Saturday, March 25 at Kentucky State University’s Aquaculture Research Center in Frankfort.

Indoor aquaculture programs are growing in popularity, particularly in urban areas, as people become more interested in local foods. Often, indoor aquaculture systems help bring the products closer to consumers and require less space and water to operate than outdoor pond aquaculture.

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The University of Kentucky Ag Equine Programs will host its ninth annual UK Equine Career and Opportunity Fair from 4:30 to 7 p.m. EST March 7 at Spindletop Hall in Lexington.

The free event provides college students with the chance to meet prospective equine industry employers and to learn about potential volunteer, internship and part-time and full-time employment opportunities. In addition to booths from area equine businesses, attendees can participate in sessions led by industry professionals, who will offer tips and one-on-one career advice.

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It is likely eastern tent caterpillars will begin to hatch soon, according to Lee Townsend, University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment extension entomologist.

“Eastern tent caterpillars are among the first insects to appear in the spring. Consequently, they can cope with the erratic temperature swings that are common in Kentucky. This year’s unseasonable warmth points to abnormally early activity,” Townsend said.

Eggs from a mass Townsend collected on Feb. 17 hatched after a weekend indoors.

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A new University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment program focused on helping livestock and forage managers more efficiently produce and use stored forages will begin next month in Adair County.

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Another round of the University of Kentucky’s Master Cattleman program will begin soon. More than 4,000 beef producers have already participated in the comprehensive program and put the management strategies they learned into practice in their operations.

The Master Cattleman program consists of 10 sessions that include management, marketing, nutrition, reproduction, health, genetics, forages, facilities, environment and end product.

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The College of Agriculture, Food and Environment will host a talk with Professor Mark Courtney, of the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago (UC), about his research findings over the past 20 years on the transition to adulthood for foster youth in state care in the U.S. The free public lecture will be held 2-2:50 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 22, in room 200, of the Funkhouser Building. 

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