Articles

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Nanomaterials are a common component in many industrial and consumer products. A team of international researchers, led by University of Kentucky scientists, have found that these tiny metal containing particles may be more toxic to plants and microorganisms than other forms of metals.

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Once again, students from the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment put together a successful team that built the national champion quarter-scale tractor for the second year in a row at the recent American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers International Quarter-Scale Tractor Student Design Competition.

Success is nothing new to the team with three first-place finishes in the past four years. In 2013, the team placed second.

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A “nuisance” is probably one of the nicest things people call mosquitoes. Mosquitoes have been called the deadliest animal on the planet, because of the diseases they spread. So why would researchers want to develop an artificial buffet for them?

The answer is simple. That “buffet” may lead to fewer mosquitoes. Stephen Dobson, a University of Kentucky professor of medical and veterinary entomology, believes his mosquito food can do just that. Others believe there’s promise too.

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Growing up an only child in Spencer County, Lilli Hanik, 16, always wondered what it would be like to have a sibling. This year, she was given her chance through Kentucky 4-H International Exchange Program.

During the summer of 2014, Hanik and her family chose to be matched with Rikako Sato, a 17-year-old student in Japan’s Labo International Exchange Program, which is similar to 4-H youth development in America.  Sato and Hanik both share a strong passion for music.

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Many folks probably associate the statement "to protect and serve" with the mission of the military, or the police or fire department.

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Jerrod Penn, a University of Kentucky doctoral student in agricultural economics in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, will receive the 2015 Graduate Teaching Award at the annual meeting of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in July. The AAEA is the discipline’s flagship professional association in North America, and Penn faced tough competition.

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Woodland owners who are wondering how to get the most from their property will benefit from attending one of three Woodland Owners Short Courses being offered around the state this summer.

Kentucky woodlands can provide many benefits including extra income and recreation for their owners, as well as providing a healthy environment for wildlife. These benefits can be enhanced through proper care and management. The 2015 Woodland Owners Short Course will cover all those aspects, for both novice and experienced landowners.

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Precision dairy farming can reduce costs and increase performance for dairy producers as they use the latest technologies to streamline their operations. The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and the University of Minnesota are co-sponsoring the second U.S. Precision Dairy Conference and Expo at the Mayo Civic Center in Rochester, Minnesota, June 24-25.

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Vegetable farming is hard work. Small-scale growers don’t usually have resources to purchase expensive machines that would help with some of the long, laborious hours of producing a marketable crop. University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment engineers will showcase an innovative machine system for market growers at a June 9 field day.

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University of Kentucky researchers may hold the answers for new plant-based pharmaceuticals and environmentally safe paint.

Jan Smalle, a scientist in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, received a four-year, $450,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture to study the mechanics of nanoharvesting plant flavonoids. Flavonoids are a complex collection of plant-made chemicals that have all kinds of functions within plants and also have many potential human health implications.

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The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards has announced that six UK students have been selected as recipients of Fulbright U.S. Student Program scholarships. The UK recipients are among more than 1,900 U.S. citizens who will travel abroad for the 2015-2016 academic year through the prestigious program.

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In the early morning hours of May 26, 2013, a fire destroyed the feed mill at a University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s C. Oran Little Research Center in Woodford County. The college’s farms are home to thousands of animals including sheep, swine, poultry and cattle, and the fire threw a big hitch in the way the UKAg staff feed those animals. But the college chose to see the fire as an opportunity to create a state-of-the-art facility that would better serve the animals and propel research programs associated with animal feeding.

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Starting this summer, University of Kentucky students from Eastern Kentucky may be more familiar with their UK Dining hamburgers than they expect. An agreement between two Kentucky processors and a large food distributor is opening up a much-needed market for Appalachian beef cattle. That burger the students enjoy might very well originate from their own family farms or neighboring farms.

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With the state’s first canola crushing facility coming online this past December, interest in canola is running high among farmers, and some Kentucky fields are starting to get a splash of yellow during the spring. A specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is working with farmers and consultants to make sure Kentucky farmers ramp up production in a way that’s agronomical and economically beneficial for them.

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With recent outbreaks of poultry and canine influenza, the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s Veterinary Diagnostic Lab has been on heightened alert. But the lab is always in the know on animal disease situations throughout the state and the country.

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Canine influenza is on the move in the United States. A new strain of the flu has led to the death of eight dogs and sickened more than 1,700 in the Chicago area. Now dogs in other states including Wisconsin, Georgia, Texas, Ohio and Indiana are getting sick. Authorities are not yet sure if the strain of the virus is the same, but are urging awareness.

University of Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Lab pathologist Lynne Cassone said there is no reason to panic, but dog owners should be vigilant.

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The Council on Forest Engineering, will be holding its 38th annual meeting in the Hilton Hotel Downtown in Lexington July 19-22. It is the first time the University of Kentucky Department of Forestry has hosted the meeting, the theme of which is “Engineering Solutions for Nonindustrial Private Forest Operations.”

The council, an international organization of forest professionals seeks and promotes the best methods of forest operations and management through fostering forest engineering in industry, government and universities.

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Kentucky cattle farmers have reaped the benefits of research conducted over the past 20 years at the University of Kentucky Agriculture, Food and Environment.

That research, conducted by Roy Burris, UK extension beef specialist, showed that producers could safely feed soy hulls to their cattle without losing any feed value. Soy hulls are the seed coats of soybeans and a by-product of soybean meal and soybean oil production.

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University of Kentucky Family Sciences doctoral student Charlene Harris received some wonderful news recently. She was selected as  one of only three recipients of the American Society of Criminology's (ASC)2015 Graduate Fellowship for Ethnic Minorities. 

Harris, a native of the island nation of Trinidad and Tobago, is the first doctoral student at UK to receive this national award since it was started by the ASC in 1989.

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Agronomists with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment began planting their 2015 hemp research plots May 14 on the university’s Spindletop Research Farm.

This is the second year for UK to conduct industrial hemp research. 2014 was the first year that hemp was legally grown in the state in decades. UK conducted the 2014 pilot project under the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s guidance.

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Two students from the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment will be the featured student speakers at Friday’s university-wide Harambee graduation ceremony.

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The commonwealth’s best were celebrated in the Capitol Rotunda in Frankfort on May 6 with an awards ceremony recognizing outstanding small businesses and small-business people. Kentucky Celebrates Small Business was presented by the Kentucky Small Business Development Center, the Kentucky district office of the U.S. Small Business Administration and the Lexington chapter of the National Association of Women Business Owners. 

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For several years, University of Kentucky students have been able to take classes related to thewine, beer and distilled spirits industries. Now, those courses will come together into a cohesive undergraduate certification program that will prepare students for careers in this growing economic sector.

Wine, brewing and distillation form a multi-billion dollar industry with myriad career opportunities in science, engineering and the arts, said Seth DeBolt, horticulture professor in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

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The Kentucky Agricultural Leadership Program is accepting nominations for Class XI.

KALP, housed in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, is an intensive two-year program designed for young agricultural producers and agribusiness individuals from Kentucky and Tennessee.

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