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The Kentucky Small Business Development Center announced that the Louisville Small Business Development Center staff is the recipient of the 2016 Sutton Landry State Star for Kentucky. The Louisville staff will be recognized at a private reception during the America’s Small Business Development Center conference in Orlando, Florida.

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The Farm City Field Day in Franklin County is still going strong after 58 years. The Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service event will take place July 7 at the Kentucky State University Research and Demonstration Farm off Mills Lane in Frankfort.

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Eastern Kentucky is working hard to find solutions to the decline in coal jobs. On June 22, 75 business owners and local leaders discussed new possibilities at the Pine Mountain Grill in Whitesburg. The luncheon was part of the Moving Forward – Letcher County initiative that is a partnership between the Kentucky Small Business Development Center and Letcher County Fiscal Court.

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Tall fescue is a popular grass for Kentucky pastures for many reasons—it is hardy and tolerates drought, has a root system that aids in controlling erosion and can stand up to heavy grazing. Farmers can even stockpile it for winter grazing. However, an endophyte fungus that commonly infects the plant can affect livestock. Summertime tends to be peak time for fungus-related problems.

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More than 300 Kentucky young people will become “style engineers” this summer, thanks to a grant Kentucky 4-H received from HughesNet and the National 4-H Council.

The Style Engineers—Fashion through Science program will show 4-H’ers at University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service day and residential camps how fashion design is connected to science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The curriculum includes real-world activities to emphasize these fields.

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Many dairy producers would say if they didn’t love and live the business, they wouldn’t be in it. Wade Mathis, of Muhlenberg County, is one of those people. His family has run a Greenville-based dairy for 66 years and most recently brought the fourth generation onto the farm, when his son Will graduated high school.

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While it’s definitely not the prettiest vegetable at harvest time, celeriac has many potential uses and may be a natural fit for Kentucky gardeners.

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The Food Connection at UK has announced the recipients of this year’s Student Opportunity Grants. Covering the gamut from the classroom to food-insecure areas in Lexington to Oaxaca, Mexico, eight projects received a total of $40,200.

The income of a $1 million Aramark endowment to promote student opportunities in food studies funds the grant program, which is in its second year. The endowment is a result of the agreement between the University of Kentucky and Aramark to run UK Dining.

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Eighty young people from across the Commonwealth will be on the University of Kentucky campus this week for the 62nd annual Kentucky Youth Seminar (KYS). These high school students will spend three days and two nights learning more about the American economic system and global economy through individual and group study.

Benjamin Locke of Larue County participated in the program last year.

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Under blue skies and perfect early June weather conditions, 24 high school students gathered in southern Kentucky to explore a future in natural resources—and in the process, had a little fun, got a little dirty and learned a lot.

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Turfgrass professionals and homeowners can find the latest buzz in turfgrass and lawn care at the University of Kentucky Turf Research Field Day. This year’s field day is July 14 at UK’s A.J. Powell Jr. Turfgrass Research Center at Spindletop Research Farm in Lexington.

Event registration and trade show begin at 7:30 a.m. EDT and go through 9 a.m. Attendees will have the option of attending four tours. Each tour begins at 9 a.m. and repeats at 10 a.m. and 11 a.m.

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University of Kentucky faculty and staff who are interested in creating a student recruiting partnership with one of the nation’s largest agri-food businesses are invited to an informational session with The Wonderful Company.

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In anticipation of the many business opportunities that could stem from the construction of a new federal prison in Roxana, the Kentucky Small Business Development Center, in partnership with Letcher County Fiscal Court, is sponsoring When Opportunity Knocks, a luncheon and resource fair from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. EDT June 22 at the Pine Mountain Grill in Whitesburg.

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Food banks in five Kentucky counties are conducting outreach programs and targeting services to veterans.

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A summer health careers camp and a project to strengthen the nursing care continuum in a rural hospital system recently received seed grants from the Kentucky Rural Community Health program.

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The University of Kentucky Horticulture Field Day is June 23 at the UK Research and Education Center in Princeton and is open to the public.

Specialists with the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment will lead tours of the center’s ornamental plots and orchard. Registration for both tours begins at 8:45 a.m. CDT.

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With at least 21 Kentuckians recently contracting salmonella, University of Kentucky poultry specialists are urging those with small flocks to be proactive about preventing the bacteria.

“The old quote ‘the best defense is a strong offense’ really holds true when keeping poultry,” said Jacqueline Jacob, UK poultry extension project manager for the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “Many of the cases in the current outbreak are linked to backyard flocks, so we want to remind folks of simple things they can do to protect themselves.”

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Dairy cattle are usually the most comfortable when outside temperatures are between 40 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit. With temperatures already rising into the 80s, dairy producers need to be vigilant about keeping cows comfortable so heat stress doesn’t become the thief of summer dairy income.

“Heat stressed cattle eat less and don’t milk or grow as well,” said Jeffrey Bewley, dairy specialist for the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “Dairy cattle can drop 5 to 10 pounds of milk during summer heat spells.”

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Due to a shortage of wheat straw in the United States, more and more equine operations are switching to rye straw for bedding. According to experts at the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, this is generally a good option, but there are several unique considerations with rye straw.

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University of Kentucky researchers have found a link between changes in microbial communities on tobacco leaves and the development of carcinogens during the curing process.

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University of Kentucky entomologists have captured Asian tiger mosquitoes in the Central Kentucky area during the past few days and are encouraging Kentuckians to take measures to prevent mosquito bites.

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Alonna Wright, a junior in the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, recently received the Alltech Young Scientist award. The global contest focused on rewarding scientific genius and recognizes future applications in the agri-science sector.

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Kentucky’s rich woodlands can provide their owners with many advantages, but proper management is important to be able to reap all the benefits. Woodland owners who are wondering how to get the most from their property can benefit from attending one of three short courses being offered around the state this summer by the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

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A University of Kentucky faculty member will be one of 59 African-born scholars based in the United States and Canada who will travel to Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda to conduct academic projects at 41 host universities through the Carnegie African Diaspora Fellowship Program. The fellows will work on a range of projects across disciplines, from agroforestry to e-learning modules for nursing, and from ethnomusicology to military mental health.

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