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In recent years, Kentucky grain farmers have increased their on-farm grain storage capacity. However, grain in storage bins has its own unique set of disease and insect problems that are very different from crops in the field. To help producers operate their storage structures more effectively, the University of Kentucky grain science working group will host a fumigation workshop Tuesday, May 13 at the UK Research and Education Center in Princeton.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently announced the award of a five-year cooperative agreement with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s Kentucky Tobacco Research and Development Center. KTRDC will work alongside the FDA in establishing programs that are relevant for scientific research on tobacco products and evolving standards for regulating those products.

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The Arboretum is recognizing 28 years of partnership between the Lexington Fayette Urban County Government and the University of Kentucky  as part of its Arbor Day festivities on April 26.

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The Dickens' twins look alike, have similar taste in food, listen to the same music, and enjoy outdoor activities. They are both good in math and science, both earned a bachelor's degree at the University of Kentucky in human nutrition science with a minor in biology, and both are pursuing careers in medicine.

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A well-managed grazing program can benefit producers, livestock and the environment. Specialists with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment will discuss good grazing management practices during the West Region Grazing Field Day Saturday, May 10 in Monroe County.

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When Brian Lee came to the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment in 2003, he became part of a team in the Department of Landscape Architecture that already had a history of teaching students through service to their communities. Now more than 10 years later, his part in that effort recently earned him the Excellence in Service-Learning award from the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture at its annual meeting in Baltimore.

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A student in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is one of three winners of the UK Sullivan Award, given to individuals who provide an outstanding humanitarian service.

Katharine E. Skarvan was selected to receive the Sullivan Award for the graduating senior woman. An animal science major, Skarvan was the founder as a freshman and the inaugural president of Wildcat Service Dogs (WSD) at the University of Kentucky. WSD is a student-run organization that trains service dogs for the benefit of disabled individuals.

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While the animals understandably take center stage at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, the environment where they live is always on the mind of UK alum Steve Foltz.

As director of horticulture for the zoo, it’s his job to create habitats for hundreds of animals every day.

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Hyungsoo Kim, associate professor in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, recently received a prestigious award from the American Council on Consumer Interests.

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UKAg alumna Sarah Martin  recently recieved the prestigious Mary McMillan Scholarship from the American Physical Therapy Association. Martin, who is from Lexington, is a student in the University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences Doctor of Physical Therapy program. She earned a bachelor's degree in animal and food sciences and a master's degree in  nutritional sciences from the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

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At the recent 29th annual MANRRS conference, the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s chapter received many awards and honors.

MANRRS stands for Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences.

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Service members and their teenage children can experience new adventures together through camps provided by the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

Extension is partnering with Life Adventure Center of the Bluegrass and the Center for Courageous Kids to host 10 adventure camps in Kentucky and neighboring states. The camps are funded by a Military-Teen Adventure Camp grant that UK Family and Consumer Sciences Extension received from the Department of Defense. 

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While the winter may have wreaked havoc on many desirable plants, it did little to affect crabgrass, the most common weed in Kentucky lawns.

“Crabgrass is an annual weed that outcompetes desirable grasses and then dies in the fall, leaving bare spots in yards for winter weeds to fill in,” said Gregg Munshaw, extension turf specialist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “The cycle keeps repeating itself until the turf stand gets poorer and poorer.”

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With spring finally arriving pastures are beginning to green up. For most cattle producers, that is a welcome event that leads to less reliance on feeding hay. But University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment specialists said this is also the time for producers to watch out for and prevent a condition called grass tetany in their cattle.

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Kentucky’s forests are a significant component of Kentucky’s economy, and a University of Kentucky economic impact study by UK forestry experts found that 2014 looks bright for increased economic growth in the state’s forestry industries.

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With more than 200,000 ponds in Kentucky, the state has many aquatic systems that need proper management. To help landowners do this, the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service and Kentucky State University are hosting two aquaculture programs in Central Kentucky.

An aquatic plant- and algae-control training program will take place from 10 a.m. EDT to 4 p.m. April 11 at the Franklin County office of the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

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Two equine industry titans will team up for University of Kentucky Ag Equine Programs’ next Distinguished Industry Lecture Series. H. Graham Motion, trainer of the 2011 Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom, and Bruce “Buck” Davidson, Jr., an eventer who competed for the United States at the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games and was an alternate for both the 2008 and 2012 U.S. Olympic teams, will speak April 21 at 6 p.m. EDT in the Ag Science Building’s Seay Auditorium on the UK campus.

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It’s time to BrAg about agriculture and related fields. The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is hosting BrAg Week March 31-April 4, a campus event to raise awareness and to promote agriculture and the career opportunities available.

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Based on a study conducted at the University of Kentucky Research and Education Center in Princeton, nitrogen losses are possible in wheat fields where the operators applied nitrogen to frozen ground in January and February.

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Producers should consider supplemental feed to help cattle through the next month to six weeks until grass is growing and is past the “watery” stage.  Energy and protein are both crucial.

Most winters take a toll on cattle, but this winter has been tougher than most. Temperatures have been colder, leading to extended periods of livestock cold stress. Ice and snow cover was relentless and more than most Kentucky beef producers have seen in the past 15 to 20 years.

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Researchers with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service in collaboration with a researcher from the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment successfully tested a new application method for poultry litter in no-till corn on a Western Kentucky farm.

Farmers often use poultry litter as an alternative to chemical fertilizer in pasture and row crop production, as it provides nutrients and organic matter for plants and soil.

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 After a long, hard winter, Kentucky sheep are ready to part ways with their wooly winter coats. Learning to shear sheep is vital to having a quality flock. The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment will offer sheep producers a chance to learn shearing techniques in a hands-on shearing school March 25-26 at the C. Oran Little Animal Research Center in Woodford County.

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Blasts of polar air across Kentucky made this winter one to remember for many, but experts say the eastern tent caterpillar probably didn’t take notice.

This insect spends the winter as tiny, fully developed caterpillars in distinctive egg masses that encircle twigs of wild cherry and related tree species. The eastern tent caterpillar is one of the first insects to become active in the spring and is well adapted to survive Kentucky’s often erratic winter and early spring weather.

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 Encouraging sustainability practices and awareness of environmental issues is at the heart of a new Living Learning Program (LLP), which will make its debut this fall at the University of Kentucky.

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