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At one time, the three Rs were considered the solid foundation of any education. Now add a new letter to that list of reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmetic—the letter E, which represents a new curriculum-based program, E-Discovery. While the E in E-Discovery stands for entrepreneur, it also wraps encouragement and enterprise into a program for students in elementary through high school.

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Over the past four decades, Lloyd Murdock, University of Kentucky extension soils specialist, has helped farmers across the state and region improve their operations. His efforts have not gone unnoticed.

Murdock recently received the Service to American/World Agriculture award from the National Association of County Agricultural Agents during their annual conference in Little Rock, Arkansas. It is the highest award given by the organization and recognizes the award winner’s major contributions to agriculture.

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University of Kentucky plant breeder Tim Phillips has developed a new tall fescue variety that is nontoxic to grazing animals.

The variety, Lacefield MaxQ II, is the result of selections Phillips, a member of the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, made from endophyte-free Kentucky 31 and related lines. Phillips named the variety for UK Professor Emeritus Garry Lacefield upon his retirement to honor his numerous contributions to the forage industry and to the college.

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Salmonella outbreaks associated with contact with live poultry in backyard flocks that began in early June are now affecting people in 45 states, and Kentucky appears to have the highest number of illnesses. University of Kentucky poultry specialists are stressing the importance of preventing bacteria for backyard flock owners.

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Music has been Halie Sawyers’ passion since she first started belting out tunes as a child. But it was not until she joined the Kentucky 4-H Performing Arts Troupe and Leadership Board that the Todd County native learned how her passion could transform her into a leader and guide her to a future career path.

“Becoming a member of the troupe was one of the best decisions I have ever made,” Sawyers said. “It has helped me grow as a leader, a musician and a person.”

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The Bluegrass State is poised to see an extended period of mostly dry conditions and a prolonged heat wave. This will create dangerous conditions for livestock, horses and pets.

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Thanks to funding from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board, the University of Kentucky Grains Center of Excellence will help advance Kentucky agriculture for decades.

The board awarded the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment a $15 million grant on July 15 to renovate and expand the UK Research and Education Center in Princeton, with particular emphasis on grain crops and forages. The university must match the award.

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The 2016 wheat growing season was nearly picture perfect for most Kentucky producers. As a result, farmers are reporting good yields across the state now that harvest is complete.

The National Agricultural Statistics Service said the overall average yield for the state’s wheat growers was 74 bushels per acre.

Carrie Knott, University of Kentucky grain crops extension specialist, said planting conditions last fall started the growing season off right.

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Visiting farms and checking greenhouses is all in a spring day’s work for Carol Hinton, Breckinridge County extension agent. It’s these visits and her attention to detail that help farmers in this agriculture-dependent county continue to grow tobacco.

Hinton is one of several Kentucky agriculture and natural resources extension agents who work with their growers to make sure they are compliant with the U.S. Tobacco Good Agricultural Practices Program. Without their compliance and participation in an annual training, growers cannot sell their tobacco.

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University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment specialists will discuss their research and industry advances during the Corn, Soybean and Tobacco Field Day July 28 at the UK Research and Education Center Farm in Princeton.

The field day begins with registration at 7 a.m. CDT. A total of four concurrent tours—three for grain crops and one for tobacco—begin at 7:50 a.m. Producers will have opportunities to participate in all the tours.

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A door to greater business opportunities is about to open for the companies and communities of Eastern Kentucky with the proposed construction of a federal prison in Roxana. For those who wish to get a leg up on the many prospects the prison will bring, the Kentucky Small Business Development Center, in partnership with the Letcher County Fiscal Court, will offer the Preparing for Opportunity training series.

Businesses can choose from workshops offered along two training tracks: government contracting and general business.

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The Kentucky Small Business Development Center announced that the Louisville Small Business Development Center staff is the recipient of the 2016 Sutton Landry State Star for Kentucky. The Louisville staff will be recognized at a private reception during the America’s Small Business Development Center conference in Orlando, Florida.

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The Farm City Field Day in Franklin County is still going strong after 58 years. The Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service event will take place July 7 at the Kentucky State University Research and Demonstration Farm off Mills Lane in Frankfort.

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Eastern Kentucky is working hard to find solutions to the decline in coal jobs. On June 22, 75 business owners and local leaders discussed new possibilities at the Pine Mountain Grill in Whitesburg. The luncheon was part of the Moving Forward – Letcher County initiative that is a partnership between the Kentucky Small Business Development Center and Letcher County Fiscal Court.

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Tall fescue is a popular grass for Kentucky pastures for many reasons—it is hardy and tolerates drought, has a root system that aids in controlling erosion and can stand up to heavy grazing. Farmers can even stockpile it for winter grazing. However, an endophyte fungus that commonly infects the plant can affect livestock. Summertime tends to be peak time for fungus-related problems.

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More than 300 Kentucky young people will become “style engineers” this summer, thanks to a grant Kentucky 4-H received from HughesNet and the National 4-H Council.

The Style Engineers—Fashion through Science program will show 4-H’ers at University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service day and residential camps how fashion design is connected to science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The curriculum includes real-world activities to emphasize these fields.

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Many dairy producers would say if they didn’t love and live the business, they wouldn’t be in it. Wade Mathis, of Muhlenberg County, is one of those people. His family has run a Greenville-based dairy for 66 years and most recently brought the fourth generation onto the farm, when his son Will graduated high school.

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While it’s definitely not the prettiest vegetable at harvest time, celeriac has many potential uses and may be a natural fit for Kentucky gardeners.

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The Food Connection at UK has announced the recipients of this year’s Student Opportunity Grants. Covering the gamut from the classroom to food-insecure areas in Lexington to Oaxaca, Mexico, eight projects received a total of $40,200.

The income of a $1 million Aramark endowment to promote student opportunities in food studies funds the grant program, which is in its second year. The endowment is a result of the agreement between the University of Kentucky and Aramark to run UK Dining.

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Eighty young people from across the Commonwealth will be on the University of Kentucky campus this week for the 62nd annual Kentucky Youth Seminar (KYS). These high school students will spend three days and two nights learning more about the American economic system and global economy through individual and group study.

Benjamin Locke of Larue County participated in the program last year.

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Under blue skies and perfect early June weather conditions, 24 high school students gathered in southern Kentucky to explore a future in natural resources—and in the process, had a little fun, got a little dirty and learned a lot.

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Turfgrass professionals and homeowners can find the latest buzz in turfgrass and lawn care at the University of Kentucky Turf Research Field Day. This year’s field day is July 14 at UK’s A.J. Powell Jr. Turfgrass Research Center at Spindletop Research Farm in Lexington.

Event registration and trade show begin at 7:30 a.m. EDT and go through 9 a.m. Attendees will have the option of attending four tours. Each tour begins at 9 a.m. and repeats at 10 a.m. and 11 a.m.

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University of Kentucky faculty and staff who are interested in creating a student recruiting partnership with one of the nation’s largest agri-food businesses are invited to an informational session with The Wonderful Company.

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In anticipation of the many business opportunities that could stem from the construction of a new federal prison in Roxana, the Kentucky Small Business Development Center, in partnership with Letcher County Fiscal Court, is sponsoring When Opportunity Knocks, a luncheon and resource fair from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. EDT June 22 at the Pine Mountain Grill in Whitesburg.

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