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Scientists in a University of Kentucky insect ecology lab recently had three papers published in a special edition of the academic journal Molecular Ecology.

The edition, focused on scientists’ efforts to unravel food webs in nature, was a result of an international meeting hosted by UK’s Department of Entomology and College of Agriculture Food and Environment in 2013.

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The type of grass planted at airports may be able to prevent bird-plane collisions in the air.

UK entomology graduate student Diana Miller is determining if a grass variety developed in New Zealand can deter white grubs, earthworms and caterpillars, and as a result, creatures like blackbirds and gulls that feed on them. She is also interested in learning if the grass can deter Canada geese, deer and other grass-feeding wildlife that can be airport hazards.

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Since its cultural debut in the fifteenth century, coffee has become one of the most heavily traded commodities in the world.

“Coffee is second only to oil in terms of value in globally traded commodities, followed in turn by natural gas and gold,” explained Michael Goodin, associate professor in the UK Department of Plant Pathology.

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Seminars designed for professional tax preparers with at least one year of tax preparation experience will be offered in 14 locations around Kentucky.

The 2014 University of Kentucky Income Tax Seminar Program is designed to present updates on federal and state tax preparation for tax professionals, enrolled agents, certified public accountants, certified financial planners and attorneys.

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The University of Kentucky’s It’s Your Reality program can open students eyes to their present and future financial responsibilities.

The event will be from 11a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 10 in the UK Student Center Grand Ballroom.  UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment’s Managing in Tough Times Initiative is sponsoring the event.

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Tickets are now on sale for the 10th annual Gala in the Garden at The Arboretum, the State Botanical Garden of Kentucky. Hosted by The Friends of The Arboretum, the fundraiser takes place from 4 to 7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 14.

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The University of Kentucky Robinson Center for Appalachian Resource Sustainability in Quicksand is hosting Mountain Ag Week Sept. 23-27.

"The main field day is Sept. 27, but we have activities planned all week," said David Ditsch, director of the center. "We still have the traditional wagon tours of our research plots, but we are also offering focused workshops and tours, where people can really immerse themselves in one or two areas of interest."

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The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and the Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association will host the fourth biennial Beef Bash, a unique field day for Kentucky beef cattle producers, on Sept. 25 at the UK Research and Education Center in Princeton.

“Research and outreach efforts such as Beef Bash are an important means of providing up-to-date information to cattle producers,” said Roy Burris, UKAg extension beef specialist. “We also are keenly aware of the importance of the social and business aspects of cattle production.”

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University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto — flanked by state and corporate leaders as well as Kentucky farmers — today announced a $5 million public-private partnership designed to elevate and promote a vibrant, healthy, sustainable food economy in Kentucky.

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Interest in irrigation is gaining momentum among Kentucky grain farmers. This is especially true after another prolonged dry spell during a crucial corn growth stage in Western Kentucky squashed many hopes for a bin-busting year. Agronomists with the University of Kentucky continue to research ways to provide added moisture for the soil.

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 While we are getting ready to celebrate the Sesquicentennial, the 150th birthday of the University of Kentucky, it is important to remember that the 'roots' of the institution in large measure can be found in the land itself, as in agriculture.

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Abi Saeed of the University of Kentucky can tell you no two plant species are alike, especially when it comes to their abilities to attract pollinators.

 Saeed and UK entomology professor Dan Potter are studying the types of bees various woody ornament plants attract in urban areas. Their study, which began in April, is the first comprehensive study of its kind.

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University of Kentucky HealthCare, in partnership with UK colleges of Public Health and Agriculture, Food and Environment and in conjunction with close to 50 community, equine and medical organizations, has released two new educational booklets within the Saddle Up Safely educational partnership.

“Trailering Your Horse Safely” and “Travel to a New Environment” cover topics including choosing a trailer, preparing a horse for a trip, information for time in transit, horse behavior away from home, overcoming horse fears and equine safety resources.

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Much of this summer has felt like early fall, butthe summer heat is going to rally over the next several days, prompting concern about livestock heat stress.

“Air temperature and humidity can combine into a one-two punch that makes it hazardous for people and animals,” said Matthew Dixon, meteorologist for the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “. Dew point temperatures above 65 degrees lead officials to declare livestock heat stress emergency alerts.”

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Many homeowners love the sight of a pristine, green lawn, but that beautiful, meticulously kept lawn may come at a cost to the environment. University of Kentucky scientists are conducting research to find the answer.

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Tobacco growers with recently topped plants and those still needing to be topped should take measures to prevent blue mold development, said Bob Pearce, extension tobacco specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

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The Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA) recently awarded University of Kentucky Family Sciences doctoral student Albert Ksinan with a Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) Emerging Scholars Grant to analyze data from the United States Department of Education (ED).

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The University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Research Foundation will induct three scientists into the UK Equine Research Hall of Fame Oct. 9 at the UK Hilary J. Boone Center.

Michelle LeBlanc, a posthumous inductee formerly of Rood and Riddle Equine Institute, Ernie Bailey, professor at the UK Gluck Equine Research Center, and Elwyn Firth, a professor at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, were selected for their contributions to equine science and research. Nominated by their peers and colleagues, LeBlanc, Bailey and Firth were selected by past Hall of Fame inductees.

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A University of Kentucky graduate student recently received two prestigious awards from the National Council on Family Relations, a professional association focused on family research, policy and practice.

Laura Frey, a doctoral candidate in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, received the Student Award and the Outstanding Graduate Student Paper Award.

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The numbers are increasing. According to U.S. Census figures, from 2000 to 2010 the number of Kentucky children living with someone other than their parents increased by more than 200 percent in some counties. That shift in parenting responsibilities can often bring its own set of challenges, and those who find themselves caring for grandchildren or nephews or nieces can sometimes find themselves at a loss for support.

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Fall and winter are quickly approaching. Producers who want to receive research-based information and tips to extend the grazing season for their ruminant animals can attend the Advanced Kentucky Grazing School Sept. 11 at the University of Kentucky Eden Shale Farm in Owenton.

The one-day event, hosted by specialists with the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, targets producers who have participated in at least one other UK grazing program.

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Recent news reports of unsafe drinking water in the Great Lakes area has drawn national attention to toxic algal blooms. In Kentucky, cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, recently were found in Green River Lake, Taylorsville Lake, Barren River Lake, Nolin Reservoir and Rough River Lake at levels that prompted a recreational advisory.

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An entomologist in the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment was recently named a fellow of the Entomological Society of America. Society members bestow this distinction on colleagues who have made outstanding contributions in research, teaching, extension and/or administration.

Professor Subba Reddy Palli is best known for developing RNA interference technology that kills insect pests and fights resistance to insecticides, particularly in beetles and bed bugs.

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With harvest approaching, it appears the yield potential for this year’s corn crop is on the decline, said Chad Lee, extension agronomist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

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