April 5, 1999 | By: Mark Eclov

Raising sheep is a year- round proposition and there are enjoyable and other "necessary" chores that must be done on a regular basis to keep the animals in peak condition and ready for market within a reasonable time.

Animal scientists at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture have designed a series of hands-on workshops timed to address sheep management issues just before they are needed. The workshops also provide a complete picture of what it takes to be a successful sheep producer.

Two segments of the four-part Ewe Profit Basic Training series are scheduled for Wednesday, May 12 at the Coldstream Sheep Unit.

The Ewe Profit school will be held during the morning from 8:30 a.m. and finishes up at 2:00 p.m. This session provides hands-on experience for new and developing sheep producers from selection through the breeding season.

The Lamb Grading workshop immediately follows the Ewe Profit school and finishes up at 4:30 p.m. This second session provides experience in grading lambs for harvest or further feeding, developing marketing plans, selecting replacement ewe lambs and includes tips on their management.

All of the workshops are geared toward people who are either looking at sheep production as a possible farming option or who have been in for a short time.

"It is a really good opportunity to get down to the most basic elements of this enterprise," said Monty Chappell, Extension sheep specialist in the UK College of Agriculture.

"Our participants get to experience first hand such management issues as trimming feet, injections, drenching, and feeding. It is a good time to determine if these common types of management practices are things they really want to deal with on a regular basis," added Chappell.

Since these workshops started in 1977, participants from 90 Kentucky counties and twelve other states have taken advantage of the training and advice from the UK staff.

Pre-registration for either the Ewe Profit School or the Lamb Grading workshop is not required, but would help in planning the event. A fee for lunch will be collected. Participants should wear comfortable work clothes and expect to get some hands on experience.

Individuals who are interested in additional details or who want to register in advance are urged to call 606-257-2716 before Tuesday, May 11.

Contact: 

Writer: Mark Eclov
(606)-257-7223

Source: Monty Chappell
(606)-257-2716